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The Daily Guide - Waynesville, MO
  • Horse rescue effort challenged by drought

  • Most lake-area residents aren’t attuned to the woes of the farming community, but the recent record-setting heat and drought are having a potentially damaging and costly impact.


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  • Most lake-area residents aren’t attuned to the woes of the farming community, but the recent record-setting heat and drought are having a potentially damaging and costly impact.
    In our own back yard, there is a severe shortage of hay used to feed livestock — and a herd of rescued horses is among the animals that are suffering. In fact, a plea has gone out to “help save the horses.”
    The Forget-Me-Not Missouri Horse Rescue and Sanctuary in Linn Creek strives to provide gentle care for abused, neglected and abandoned horses. That compassionate effort is being thwarted by the heat and drought.
    Due to adverse weather conditions, the rescue horses are already eating their winter hay supply, according to Connie Hendrix, owner and manager of the Horse Rescue and Sanctuary.
    “Donations of good quality hay or funds to buy hay are greatly needed and appreciated,” she explained.
    The history
    Forget-Me-Not came to be when Hendrix became aware of horses in the lake area that needed a safe haven when they were no longer wanted or useful.  Some horses are holder that were used and abused, and then thrown aw3ay when no longer useful, Hendrix explained.
    As owner of Connie’s Dog Grooming, Hendrix has a passion for helping dogs and horses. Her interest in horses is rooted in her dog rescue business, which transitioned into horses when people turned to her for help. Today, she gets calls from law enforcement officials, from people who know of abused and abandoned horses and from horse owners who just can’t deal with the expense and care.
    Nearly every horse is rehabilitated and offered for adoption. The rest are part of her menagerie at the farm near Linn Creek. Hendrix said adoptive families are closely matched with the horse. She estimates she has placed between 20 and 30 horses in homes over the years. Those that remain at the farm are available for sponsorships by individuals or families who want to help and who want the experience of owning a horse. The sponsorship income helps cover costs.
    By providing a network of support and basic equine educational resources for humans, the unnecessary suffering and unfortunate fate that many horses endure can be avoided, Hendrix said.
    “We want to do more than care for the horses that are suffering,” she said. “We want to find a way to break the cycle of abuse and neglect.”
    Hendrix has been rescuing horses in the lake area for 15 years, and to date has handled the expenses herself. Her dog grooming business has helped support the horse sanctuary. But now, she says, she needs help with not only donations of hay but money and in-kind support.
    To make a donation, contact Hendrix at 573-346-0147 or 573-216-3838; or email at bluemoon28@ hughes.net or connie@missouriforgetmenot.com.

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