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The Daily Guide - Waynesville, MO
  • Black history month profile: Dr. Sonya Campbell

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  • Q  What are your proudest accomplishments?
    A Being a product of this community, going away to college and returning to contribute to the growth and development of the community as an adult, is an honor. My most Proudest accomplishment is not measured by self-fulfillment, by  the success of others.
    My motto is “If you give a child a fish, you feed him for a day.  Teach a child to fish you feed him for a life time.  What a better way to impact our community but through our youth, by cultivating them to be life long learners.   
    My ability to empower others is my proudest accomplishments, adults and youth alike, has been a positive impact on our community.   Whether I am working at Wood Elementary or in the Community, I want each person to be successful. Within the community I have served on Boards and been involved in organizations  which empower others.
    Also, Finishing my Doctorate degree while being an adjunct professor and principal.
    Q  Explain how race has changed your life experiences?
    A  Being an African American woman, race is a part of my life, but it is not all of my life.   I have learned to over come things to make sure race does not hinder me from achieving my goals.  I have always lived having a Dual view of the world. What one may call looking from the inside out.  -  having a dual perception of things.  Being able to adapt in all setting.  I believe that everyone deserves equal opportunities regardless of their race and that is the only way we as individuals and as a community can grow and develop.
    Q  Who do you look up to and why?
    A  My Parents – Frank and Sue Campbell, they taught  me the three P’s ----Pray, Plan and Prepare! Life’s important lesson that give unto the Lord and let him have his way and  All things are possible through  JESUS Christ. They showed me how to dream big and stay strong and treat each person with dignity. They have been the cornerstone of my life I admire them for their commitment to family and community.  Their unfailing good nature, having the ability to lead without ever making me feel directed.   They taught me courage, moral values, respect, to say maam and sir.   They have always been by my side.  
    Q  Why is black history month important?
    A  To appreciate the lives and achievement of African Americans by understanding the rich culture, history, strength and involvement of African Americans in this country.  Because , the lives and achievements of African Americans remained essentially absent --- it is part of history!  Black history month also tells of the injustices that were done during slavery and the many that stood together to over come injustices.  Black history month recognizes the contributions made to our nation.  From the Buffalo soldiers to Tuskegee airmen to the poets and actors, “Were we always there – shaping the lives and culture of society.” – Black history is part of Our Nations History.
    Page 2 of 2 - Q  Where do you see society 30 years from now?
    A  I see America as a Salad Bowl (representing each ethnic group), with rich blends of cultural traditions.  As the demographics change, society as a whole will be more diverse.  The Minorities will be the Majority.  The seniors and young people will grow in population and diversity.   We will be more integrated .   Technology will be integrated in everything we do.  As a society, things that we see in isolation ie TV Channels – BET(Black Entertainment TV) , Latino Channel-- they will all be integrated.   To have all culture and shows on ABC, NBC and all the other networks.
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