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The Daily Guide - Waynesville, MO
Anyone who knows Eric knows that he writes about a little bit of everything
BWV 543
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By Eric Bergeson
Since 1997, Eric has owned and operated Bergeson Nursery, rural Fertile, MN, a business his grandfather started in 1937. With the active participation of his parents, who owned the business for the previous twenty five years, and his younger brother ...
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Eric Bergeson's The Country Scribe
Since 1997, Eric has owned and operated Bergeson Nursery, rural Fertile, MN, a business his grandfather started in 1937. With the active participation of his parents, who owned the business for the previous twenty five years, and his younger brother Joe, who is now president of the company, the business has nearly tripled in size during Eric’s ownership tenure. The holder of a Master of Arts in History from the University of North Dakota, Eric has taught courses in history and political science at the University of Minnesota, Crookston. He is also an adjunct lecturer in history for Hamline University, St. Paul, MN. Eric’s hobbies include Minnesota Twins baseball, Bach organ music, bookstores, hiking, photography, singing old country music with his brother Joe, and watching the wildlife on the swamp in front of his house eight miles outside of Fertile, Minn.
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This is one of the great pieces Bach wrote for organ, played on an organ from Bach's time. The numbering system of Bach's music runs from zero to a thousand or so, and it is convenient for those like me who get confused between one A minor Prelude and Fugue and the other. 

This piece is in A minor. It is an impish, even demonic work. Modern fundamentalists would be right to be scared of its power, something the faithful in Bach's time savored rather than feared. 

Bach's music is really rhetoric. It makes an argument, an argument more eloquent than any possible in English. The closing chords are the final, irrefutable statements of the arguement. The performer, John Scott Whitely understands that, and finally shows a little emotion at the end. 

Like most of Bach's pieces, BWV 543 is best understood if listened to many times by many interpreters. This recording is a good start, however. 

 

 

 

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