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The Daily Guide - Waynesville, MO
  • Jury finds Meta man guilty of murder

  • It took a jury an estimated four hours of deliberation Friday in the Texas County Courthouse to find a Meta man guilty of murdering his girlfriend in June 2010 in Maries County.
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  • It took a jury an estimated four hours of deliberation Friday in the Texas County Courthouse to find a Meta man guilty of murdering his girlfriend in June 2010 in Maries County.
    Terry Glenn Fritz, 43, was found guilty of first-degree murder, a Class A felony, and armed criminal action, an unclassified felony, in the death of Kinga Gillibrand, 35, the mother of his son.
    The prosecution waived the death penalty, so Fritz will be sentenced to life in prison without parole for the murder charge, according to Maries County Prosecutor Terry Daley Schwartze.
    However, a sentence hearing for the armed criminal action charge is scheduled to take place in July, Schwartz said. Fritz will remain in the Texas County Jail until that hearing.
    Maries County Sheriff Chris Heitman wrote in an email to media late last week that “this has been a lengthy and expensive investigation. I am glad justice was served and the victim's family can get some closure. I have to commend the prosecutors for their hard work with this investigation.” The trial, which was moved to Texas County on a change of venue, took place April 21-25.
    Schwartze was assisted by two prosecutors with the state attorney general’s office. Fritz, who was represented by a public defender for the first three and half years of the case, represented himself during last week’s trial, Schwartze said.
    According to Schwartze, Gillibrand was reported missing in June 2010 in the Meta area, but Fritz was not arrested in connection with the incident until July 2010. The remains of Gillibrand were not found until November 2010 when a deer hunter came upon her, Schwartze said. It was determined that Gillibrand had been shot in the back and was found about a mile to a mile and a half from where the incident occurred, according to Schwartze.
    Schwartze said while putting this case together, over 28 witnesses, including several law enforcement officials from the Missouri State Highway Patrol and Maries County Sheriff’s Office, as well as forensic anthropologists, a medical examiner, a coroner and Rolla police dispatchers, were interviewed.
    According to Schwartze, the trial had been scheduled at least three previous times but was delayed because certain parts of evidence were not available at the time and the investigation was so extensive.

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