Waynesville's famous frog, Croaker, has just become a little more famous recently. Croaker, known as Frog Rock, is now a geographical location in the Geographic Names Information System (GNIS) database.

Waynesville's famous frog, Croaker, has just become a little more famous recently. Croaker, known as Frog Rock, is now a geographical location in the Geographic Names Information System (GNIS) database.
According to the U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) website, the database was developed by the USGS along with the U.S. Board on Geographic Names and it “contains information about physical and cultural geographic features in the United States and associated areas, both current and historical (not including roads and highways). The database holds the Federally recognized name of each feature and defines the location of the feature by state, county, USGS topographic map, and geographic coordinates.”
Croaker's official name in the GNIS is actually Frog Rock and is one of five Frog Rocks in the database, according to Waynesville Mayor Luge Hardman. Hardman announced the entry of Croaker into the database on the city's Facebook page earlier this week.
“It is kind of cool! You can now find Frock Rock, aka Croaker, on all federal publications and maps,” Hardman wrote.
A google search for Frog Rock and maps will show Frog Rock as a historical point of interest along Old Route 66 as you drive into Waynesville.
Residents who are used to seeing Croaker may have noticed that he recently got a new paint job, as well as some new supports that are meant to look like lilly pads. Croaker has been sitting atop the hill in Waynesville since the mid 90's.
Croaker didn't start out as a frog, in fact, Croaker was a  boulder buried in the side of the hill that didn't emerge until the Missouri Department of Transportation widened Historical Route 66 in the 90's. That boulder became W.H. Croaker, his official name, when local tattoo artist and former Army medic Phil Nelson carved him out of the boulder and painted him.
Over the course of nine months, sometime in 1996, according to Daily Guide records, Nelson spent his mornings sculpting the rock formation on the hill into a frog, free of charge.
Croaker has become a tourist point of interest and is the reason for first Frogfest and now Frogtoberfest, where locals can enter frog races, eat frog legs,  and vote to make a local business person kiss a frog.